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GitOps

Port's GitHub integration makes it possible to manage Port entities with a GitOps approach, making your code repositories the source of truth for the various infrastructure assets you want to manage.

💡 GitHub GitOps common use cases

  • Use GitHub as the source-of-truth for your microservices, packages, libraries and other software catalog assets.
  • Allow developers to keep the catalog up-to-date, by making updates to files in their Git repositories.
  • Create a standardized way to document software catalog assets in your organization.

Managing entities using GitOps

To manage entities using GitOps, you will need to add a port.yml file to the default branch (usually main) of your repository.

The port.yml file can specify one or more Port entities that will be ingested to Port, and any change made to the port.yml file will also be reflected inside Port.

Github app

To manage entities using GitOps and the port.yml file, Port's Github app must be installed, as it listens to push events sent from Github.

This means that if the port.yml file exists in the repository before installing the app, it will not be picked up automatically. You will need to make some update to the port.yml file and push it to the repository in order for the Git app to properly track and ingest the entity information.

GitOps port.yml file

The port.yml file is how you specify your Port entities that are managed using GitOps and whose data is ingested from your Git repositories.

Here are examples for valid port.yml files:

identifier: myEntity
title: My Entity
blueprint: myBlueprint
properties:
myStringProp: myValue
myNumberProp: 5
myUrlProp: https://example.com
relations:
mySingleRelation: myTargetEntity
myManyRelation:
- myTargetEntity1
- myTargetEntity2

Since both of the valid port.yml formats follow the same structure, the following section will explain the format based on the single entity example.

port.yml structure

Here is an example port.yml file:

identifier: myEntity
title: My Entity
blueprint: myBlueprint
properties:
myStringProp: myValue
myNumberProp: 5
myUrlProp: https://example.com
relations:
mySingleRelation: myTargetEntity
myManyRelation:
- myTargetEntity1
- myTargetEntity2
  • The identifier key is used to specify the identifier of the entity that the app will create and keep up-to-date when changes occur:
identifier: myEntity
title: My Entity
...
  • The title key is used to specify the title of the entity:
identifier: myEntity
title: My Entity
...
  • The blueprint key is used to specify the identifier of the blueprint to create this entity from:
...
title: My Entity
blueprint: myBlueprint
...
  • The properties key is used to map the values to the different properties of the entity:
...
title: My Entity
blueprint: myBlueprint
properties:
myStringProp: myValue
myNumberProp: 5
myUrlProp: https://example.com
...
  • The relations key is used to map target entities to the different relations of the entity:
...
properties:
myStringProp: myValue
myNumberProp: 5
myUrlProp: https://example.com
relations:
mySingleRelation: myTargetEntity

Ingesting repository file contents

It is possible to use the contents of files in the repository as the value for entity properties using a simple reference.

The following example will read the string contents of ~/module1/README.md and upload it to myStringProp of the specified entity.

Repository folder structure used for the example:

root
|
+- port.yml
|
+-+ module1
| |
| +- README.md
| |
| +-+ src
...

port.yml file:

blueprint: code_module
title: Module 1
identifier: module_1_entity
properties:
myStringProp: file://module1/README.md

Using relative paths

It is also possible to use paths relative to the location of the port.yml spec file.

For example: file://./ is used to reference a file in the same directory as the port.yml file. file://../ is used to reference a file that is one directory above and so on.

The following example reads README.md and module1/requirements.txt using paths relative to port.yml

Repository folder structure used for the example:

root
|
+-+ meta
| |
| +-- port.yml
| |
| +-+ README.md
|
+-+ module1
| |
| +- requirements.txt
| |
| +-+ src
...

port.yml file:

blueprint: code_module
title: Module 1
identifier: module_1_entity
properties:
readme: file://./README.md
module1Requirements: file://../module1/requirements.txt

Examples

Check out the example repository for a microservice blueprint and a matching port.yml file which specifies a microservice entity.

Advanced

Refer to the advanced page for advanced use cases and configurations.